Welcome to the second issue of Ytori! We are still receiving comments and questions about our first issue, most frequently about the name of the magazine. Ytori and its variant itori are the Spanish renderings of the Timucua word for alligator. The Timucua inhabited North Florida for centuries before the arrival of Europeans.

During the concept stage, we considered and rejected dozens of possible magazine names. We wanted a unique, memorable name that resonates with our state, university, and, most particularly, our college. Some names were much better than others — one that surfaced briefly, Jacma, a tongue-in-cheek acronym for “just another college magazine,” shows just how far out some suggestions were. Inevitably and appropriately, they all ended up on the cutting-room floor.

A suggestion that we consider a word from the language of the Timucua led us to one of the few scholars in the world who know the language, Professor of Anthropology Aaron Broadwell. With his help, we quickly identified Ytori as an ideal candidate, as it captures our university’s symbol, the history of the state and its native peoples, and the role of the Spanish in Florida. All of these are reflective of our broad mission to teach and study nature, society, and humanity.

In this issue, we learn more about Professor Broadwell, the Timucua, and the alligator in Florida. Even as we are going to press with this issue, we are preparing for the fall issue of the magazine, which will come out around the time the university will be announcing its new fundraising campaign. As part of this effort, we in the college are also gearing up for an exciting five-year campaign to increase resources for our students, our faculty, and the important work they do every day. Stay tuned!

With best regards,


David E. Richardson
Dean, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences